Hong Lim(洪林홍림)

Honglim_Top

Information

Address #64-22, Gwangjang Market, Yeji-dong, Jongno-gu, Seoul
Phone 02-2267-1751
Hours

08:00~20:00

Closed on every Sunday, Korean Thanksgiving Day and lunar New Year’s Day

Payment: Won or credit cards

Hong Lim was named after the mixture of the family names of the late Mrs. Hong Woo-sun, and her son, Mr. Lim Deok0jin and has been running at the same place for 64 years since 1952. This shops sells jotgal, jeot and crab marinated in Soy Sauce mainly.
EMS shipping available.

 

The products will be shipped on Monday or Tuesday by EMS after your when your payment has been confirmed if you order from abroad.

It takes two to four days to Japan, Hong Kong or Southeast Asia, and three  to five days to to China, Australia or USA, and four to six days to Europe.

*Please note that delivery speed may slow down in your domestic area and we have no responsibility for it.

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The products you would like to order

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Many foreigners visit the shop since it opened in 1952. 

They provide EMS service and it takes two or three days for Asian countries. Ice packs can be in the box to ship overseas.

MENU

Gwangjangmarket_ganjanggejang2_500g_40,000won

Ganjang-gejang

1Kg 40,000won

Gwangjangmarket_yangnyeomgejang1_500g_25,000won

Yangnyeomgejang

1Kg  25,000won

Gwangjangmarket_pollace egg_500g_15,000won

Myeoungran jeot

500g 15,000won

Gwangjangmarket_changranjeot

Changran- jeot

500g 10,000won

Gwangjangmarket_babyOctopus_500g_10,000won

Nakji-jeot
500g 10,000won

Gwangjangmarket_smallOctopus1_500g_10,000won

jjukumi-jeot
500g 10,000won

Gwangjangmarket_Squid1_500g_7,000won

Ojingeo-jeot
500g 7,000won

Gwangjangmarket_Plum-Jangajji_500g_10,000won

Plum jangajji
500g 10,000won

Gwangjangmarket_smallAnchovy-Bokkeum1_500g_10,000won

Anchovy Bokkeum

500g 10,000won

Gwangjangmarket_Matgim_seasonedLaver_500g_5,000won

Matgim

500g 10,000won

Gwangjangmarket_Ojingeochae-bokkeoum1_500g_10,000won

Ojingeochae bokkeum

MENU

Jeotgal or jeot
Jeotgal or jeot (Korean pronunciation: [tɕʌtkal]) is a salted fermented food in Korean cuisine. It is made with various seafood, such as shrimp, oysters, shellfish, fish, fish eggs, and fish intestines.
Jeotgal is mainly used as a condiment in pickling kimchi and as a dipping sauce for pig’s feet (jokbal) and blood/noodle sausage (sundae). Sometimes jeotgal, commonly saeujeot, is added to Korean style stews (jjigae) and soups (guk and tang), for flavor instead of using salt or soy sauce (ganjang).
The types of jeotgal vary depending on main ingredients, regions, and family and personal preferences. In past times, due to the limited transportation, regions near seas had more types of jeot compared to the inland areas.

Ganjang-gejang

This shop sells Ganjang gejang made by male crabs which flavor is better than the cheap female crabs
Gejang or gejeot is a variety of jeotgal, salted fermented seafood in Korean cuisine, which is made by marinating fresh raw crabs either in ganjang (soy sauce) or in a sauce based on chili pepper powder. The term consists of the two words; ge, meaning “a crab”, and jang which means “condiment” in Korean. Although gejang originally referred only to crabs marinated in soy sauce, it has begun to be called “ganjang gejang” these days to differentiate it from yangnyeom gejang (양념게장). The latter is relatively a new dish that emerged since the restaurant business began to thrive in South Korea. “Yangnyeom” literally means “seasoning” or “seasoned” in Korean but refers to the spicy sauce made with chili pepper powder.
Gyeongsang, Jeolla, and Jeju Island are famous for their own characteristic gejang. It is a representative speciality of Yeosu in South Jeolla Province, and a traditional Jeolla cuisine dish. 1Kg 40,000won

Yangnyeom-gejang
Gejang or gejeot is a variety of jeotgal, salted fermented seafood in Korean cuisine, which is made by marinating fresh raw crabs either in ganjang (soy sauce) or in a sauce based on chili pepper powder. The term consists of the two words; ge, meaning “a crab”, and jang which means “condiment” in Korean.[1] Although gejang originally referred only to crabs marinated in soy sauce, it has begun to be called “ganjang gejang” these days to differentiate it from yangnyeom gejang (양념게장). The latter is relatively a new dish that emerged since the restaurant business began to thrive in South Korea. “Yangnyeom” literally means “seasoning” or “seasoned” in Korean but refers to the spicy sauce made with chili pepper powder.
Gyeongsang, Jeolla, and Jeju Island are famous for their own characteristic gejang. It is a representative speciality of Yeosu in South Jeolla Province, and a traditional Jeolla cuisine dish.1Kg 25,000won

Myeoungran- jeot
Myeongran-jeot (Korean pronunciation: [tɕʌtkal]) is a salted fermented Pollock egg in Korean cuisine
Pollock (alternatively spelled pollack; pronounced /ˈpɑːlək/) is the common name used for either of the two species of North Atlantic marine fish in the Pollachius (“P.”) genus. Both P. pollachius and P. virens are commonly referred to as pollock. Other names for P. pollachius include the Atlantic pollock, European pollock, lieu jaune, and lythe; while P. virens is sometimes known as Boston blues (distinct from bluefish), coalfish (or coley), silver bills or saithe. Mentaiko (明太子?) is the marinated roe of pollock and cod is a common ingredient in Japanese cuisine. Mentaiko originated from myeongnan jeot of Korea Jeotgal which explains the reason 明太 is pronounced Mentai, an adopted pronunciation of Myeongtae in Korean, and was introduced to Japan after the Russo-Japanese War. Toshio Kawahara (川原 俊夫 Kawahara Toshio?), a Busan-born Japanese, adapted Korean mentaiko to Japanese tastes in Fukuoka in the 1949. The typical seasoning and flavor is different in Japan.500g 15,000won

Changran- jeot
Changran-jeot is a salted fermented Alaska pollack tripe in Korean cuisine
500g 10,000won

Nakji-jeot
Nakji-jeot is a salted fermented small Octopus in Korean cuisine
500g 10,000won

jjukumi-jeot
jjukumi-jeot Nakji-jeot is a salted fermented baby Octopus in Korean cuisine
500g 10,000won

Ojingeo-jeot
Ojingeo-jeot is a salted fermented Squid in Korean cuisine
Seasoned Dry Radish 500g 7,000won

Plum jangajji
Plum jangajji is made fromplums and HC Wellbeing Food’s sticky rice gochujang and fermented in jars. It has no preservatives and no colorings.
Plums contain citric acid which helps with the absorption of calcium. It also contains calcium, sodium, picric acid and nucleolus which help to keep you healthy.500g 10,000won

Anchovy Bokkeum
Bokkeum is a generic term to refer to a Korean dish made by stir-frying ingredients in a sauce. According to Korean dictionaries, the verb form of bokkeum, “bokkda” (볶다) means “cooking dried ingredients over heat.” However, bokkeum not only refers to dishes made by stir-frying ingredients to a dry state, but also indicates dishes with a thick sauce after cooking.
500g 10,000won

Matgim
Matgim is seasoned laver in korea
500g 10,000won

Ojingeochae bokkeum
Ojingeochae bokkeum (lit. “stir-fried dried shredded squid”) is a Korean dish made by stir-frying dried shredded squid in a sauce based on gochujang (Korean chili pepper paste) and sugar or corn syrup. The ojingeo in the dish’s name refers to squid while bokkeum means “stir-fried”. It is eaten as banchan (small side dishes) when having a meal with a bowl of cooked rice
Cut the dried shredded squid into smaller pieces (approximately 4cm). Pour some oil on a heated pan and put the dried shredded squid and stir-fry thoroughly in low heat. Set aside the cooked squid and pour gochujang, sugar, cooking wine or water in a pan. When the ingredients start to boil, add the cooked dried shredded squid and mix together until the sauce gets on the squid evenly. Add some sesame oil and sprinkle some sesame seeds for garnish.

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